Planned Documentation Revision v1

parent 85edd31e
......@@ -3,8 +3,8 @@
 
NOTE: Currently a WIP (work in progress, some links might not work and some documentation is likely missing.)
NOTE: Currently a WIP (work in progress), some links might not work and some documentation is likely missing.
 
[Using Parrot Linux](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/startpage/) | [Troubleshooting](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/trbl/trbl-start/) | [Linux Beginner Guide](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/library/lbg-start/) | [Home](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/)
\ No newline at end of file
[Using Parrot Linux](../info/start.md) | [Troubleshooting](../trbl/start.md) | [Linux Beginner Guide](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/library/lbg-start/) | [Home](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/)
---
title: 'Parrot Home Installation'
title: 'Debian Installer'
taxonomy:
category:
- docs
......@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ Once the installer starts the initial screen will appear. Press Enter to boot or
7. Now it is time to partition disks. Automatic partitioning can be done either on an entire drive, or available free space on a drive. This is recommended for new users or anyone in a hurry. If autopartition is not wanted, choose "Manual" from the menu.
8. If there is an existing DOS or Windows partition that has to be preserved, be very careful with automatic partitioning. If manual partitioning is selected, the installer can be used to resize existing FAT or NTFS partitions to create room for the Parrot install: simply select the partition and specify its new size.
8. If there is an existing Windows or Linux installation that has to be preserved, be very careful with automatic partitioning. If manual partitioning is selected, the installer can be used to resize existing FAT or NTFS partitions to create room for the Parrot install: simply select the partition and specify its new size.
9. On the next screen the partition table will be seen, how the partitions will be formatted, and where they will be mounted. Select a partition to modify or delete it. If automatic partitioning was selected, the "Finish" option can be selected and the changes can be written to disk to use what it set up. Remember to assign at least one partition for swap space and to mount a partition on __/__.
......
......@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@ NOTE: to install docker on ParrotLinux xecute the following, otherwise start at
#### Parrotsec/Parrot-core
**Official Parrot Security Base system without tools.**
**Official Parrot OS Base system without tools.**
Start a new instance
......@@ -24,13 +24,13 @@ Install/Update from Docker Cloud
```
Install/Update from local Dockerfile
```bash
git clone https://dev.parrotsec.org/parrot/docker-images && cd docker-images
git clone https://dev.parrotsec.org/parrot-build/docker-images && cd docker-images
docker build -t parrot-core[:version] parrot-core
```
#### Parrotsec/Parrot
**Official Parrot Security image with basic security tools.**
**Official Parrot OS image with basic security tools.**
-Start a new instance
......@@ -48,7 +48,7 @@ Install/Update from Docker Cloud
```
Install/Update from local Dockerfile
```bash
git clone https://dev.parrotsec.org/parrot/docker-images && cd docker-images
git clone https://dev.parrotsec.org/parrot-build/docker-images && cd docker-images
docker build -t parrot[:version] parrot
```
......@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@ Install/Update from Docker Cloud
```
Install/Update from local Dockerfile
```bash
git clone https://dev.parrotsec.org/parrot/docker-images && cd docker-images
git clone https://dev.parrotsec.org/parrot-build/docker-images && cd docker-images
docker build -t metasploit[:version] metasploit
```
......
......@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@
## NOTE: Currently a WIP (work in progress, some links might not work and some documentation is likely missing.)
How to Install Parrot Security in VMware Workstation Step-by-Step Guide
How to Install Parrot OS in VMware Workstation Step-by-Step Guide
This step-by-step article shows you how to install Parrot Security in VMware Workstation step-by-step but you can also use VMware Player which is free. This tutorial also helps if you install Parrot Security on physical hardware. In fact, Parrot Security installation is not very hard. First of all, why Parrot Security as a virtual machine? Because, if you are new on Parrot Security, it is very safe to use it as virtual machine. You can easily explore Parrot Security new features without damaging any live data on your computer.
......
......@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ These images can be installed from removable DVD, USB or SD storage media.
The easiest way to prepare the installation media is to download any of the 64-bit Parrot images that will fit on the device and burn it. Of course this will destroy anything already there.
To learn how to burn the images, please see [here](../../getting-started/create-boot-device/).
To learn how to burn the images, please see [here](create-boot-device.md).
Some BIOSes can boot USB or SD card storage directly or allow to boot temporarily from them, and some cannot. You may need to configure your BIOS to boot from a “Removable Drive” or even a “USB-ZIP” to get it done.
......
# VERIFY!
# Missing photos
Introduction To Virtualbox Guest Additions
# Introduction To Virtualbox Guest Additions
The Guest Additions are designed to be installed inside a virtual machine after the guest operating system has been installed.
They consist of device drivers and system applications that optimize the guest operating system for better performance and usability.
......@@ -23,59 +23,45 @@ Features Of Virtualbox Guest Additions
Shared clipboard
Shared clipboard from host to Parrot.
Guest Additions Installation(s)
Method 1 (Easiest)
1. Open a terminal and update your packages list from the repository with sudo apt-get update
# Method 1 (Easiest)
1. Open a terminal and update your packages list from the repository to retrieve the latest list of available packages
`sudo apt update`
2. Install the Guest Additions from ParrotOS repository with sudo apt-get install virtualbox-guest-utils
If requested to continue write Y then hit Enter on your keyboard.
2. Install the Guest Additions from ParrotOS repository with the following command
3. And install the last package with sudo apt-get install virtualbox-guest-x11
`sudo apt install -y virtualbox-guest-dkms`
4. When installation is completed, you can reboot your machine with sudo reboot
1. When installation is completed, you can reboot your machine with sudo reboot
5. Check if Guest Additions are correctly installed by running sudo /usr/sbin/VBoxService -V
2. Check if Guest Additions are correctly installed by running sudo /usr/sbin/VBoxService -V
Method 2 (From ISO)
1. On Virtual Machine menu bar, select Devices > Insert Guest Additions CD image…
# Method 2 (From ISO)
1. On Virtual Machine menu bar, select Devices > Insert Guest Additions CD image…
2. Login as root by using sudo su, and insert your current user password
3. Enter the CDROM directory by using cd /media/cdrom0/
4. Copy the Guest Additions file to “/root” directory with cp VBoxLinuxAdditions.run ~
5. Enter the “/root” directory with cd ~
6. Give the permission for execute “+x” to “VBoxLinuxAdditions.run” by using chmod +x VBoxLinuxAdditions.run
7. Execute “VBoxLinuxAdditions.run” with ./VBoxLinuxAdditions.run
8. At installation completed, reboot the virtual machine with reboot
 
......
......@@ -15,11 +15,11 @@ visible: true
Not sure were to begin? Start with downloads.
Not sure if Parrot will work with your system? Check [system requirements](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/system-requirements/) and our [supported hardware](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/trbl/supported-hardware/) page.
Not sure if Parrot will work with your system? Check [system requirements](../info/system-requirements.md) and our [supported hardware](../trbl/supported-hardware.md) page.
 
- [Downloads](download.md)
- [What version should i download](download.md)
- [Create a boot device](create-boot-device.md)
......@@ -28,12 +28,10 @@ Not sure if Parrot will work with your system? Check [system requirements](https
Virtual Machines and Containers
- [Parrot on Docker](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/install-docker.md)
- [Parrot on QubesOS](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/install-qubes/)
- [Install VMware](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/install-vmware/)
- [Install Virtualbox](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/install-virtualbox/)
- [Install Virtualbox Guest Additions](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/install-vbox-guest-add/)
- [Install KVM](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/install-kvm/)
- [Parrot on Docker](install-docker.md)
- [Parrot on QubesOS](install-qubes.md)
- [Install on Virtualbox](install-virtualbox.md)
- [Install Virtualbox Guest Additions](install-vbox-guest-add.md)
 
......@@ -56,13 +54,4 @@ Virtual Machines and Containers
 
 
 
 
 
[Using Parrot Linux](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/startpage/) | [Troubleshooting](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/trbl/trbl-start/) | [Linux Beginner Guide](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/library/lbg-start/) | [Home](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/)
......@@ -23,11 +23,11 @@ The documentation is still under construction, and all the Parrot users are invi
### User Guide
- [Getting Started](getting-started/start-pg.md)
- [Getting Started](getting-started/start.md)
- [Using Parrot](info/startpage.md)
- [Using Parrot](info/start.md)
- [Troubleshooting](trbl/trbl-start.md)
- [Troubleshooting](trbl/start.md)
### Infrastructure Zone
......
 
 
NOTE: Currently a WIP (work in progress, some links might not work and some documentation is likely missing.)
 
[Using Parrot Linux](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/startpage/) | [Troubleshooting](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/trbl/trbl-start/) | [Linux Beginner Guide](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/library/lbg-start/) | [Home](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/)
\ No newline at end of file
 
 
NOTE: Currently a WIP (work in progress, some links might not work and some documentation is likely missing.)
 
[Using Parrot Linux](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/startpage/) | [Troubleshooting](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/trbl/trbl-start/) | [Linux Beginner Guide](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/library/lbg-start/) | [Home](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/)
\ No newline at end of file
 
### KVM
KVM is a full virtualization solution for Linux on x86 (64-bit included) hardware containing virtualization extensions (Intel VT or AMD-V). It consists of a loadable kernel module, kvm.ko, that provides the core virtualization infrastructure and a processor specific module, kvm-intel.ko or kvm-amd.ko.
#### Installation
It is possible to install only QEMU and KVM for a very minimal setup, but most users will also want libvirt for a convenient configuration and management of the virtual machines (libvirt-daemon-system - libvirt, virt-manager - a GUI for libvirt).
Open your terminal and write the following command:
```bash
apt install qemu-kvm libvirt-clients qemu-utils libvirt-daemon-system
```
The daemon libvirt-bin daemon will start automatically at boot time and load the appropriate kvm modules, kvm-amd or kvm-intel, which are shipped with the Linux kernel Debian package. If you intend to create VMs from the command-line, install virtinst.
In order to be able to manage virtual machines as regular user, that user needs to be added to some groups.
Type the following command:
```bash
adduser <user> libvirt
adduser <user> libvirt-qemu
```
You should then be able to list your domains ("domain" is a virtual machine managed by libvirt):
```bash
virsh list --all
```
#### Connecting to libvirt
By default, if virsh is run as a normal user it will connect to libvirt using qemu:///session URI string. This URI allows virsh to manage only the set of VMs belonging to this particular user. To manage the system set of VMs (i.e., VMs belonging to root) virsh should be ran as root or with qemu:///system URI:
```bash
virsh --connect qemu:///system list --all
```
Not to specify the --connect option for every command, the URI string can be set in the LIBVIRT_DEFAULT_URI environment variable:
```bash
export LIBVIRT_DEFAULT_URI='qemu:///system'
```
#### Creating a new guest
The easiest way to create and manage VM guest is using GUI application Virtual Machine Manager virt-manager.
In alternative, you may create VM guest via command line. Below is example to create a ParrotSec guest with name parrotsec:
```bash
virt-install --virt-type kvm --name parrotsec --memory 512 --cdrom ~/Downloads/Parrot/.iso --disk size=4 --os-variant debian
```
Since the guest has no network connection yet, you will need to use the GUI virt-viewer to complete the install.
You can avoid pulling the ISO by using the --location option. To obtain text console for the installation you can also provide --extra-args "console=ttyS0":
```bash
virt-install --virt-type kvm --name squeeze-amd64 \
--location http://httpredir.debian.org/debian/dists/squeeze/main/installer-amd64/ \
--extra-args "console=ttyS0" -v --os-variant debiansqueeze \
--disk size=4 --memory 512
```
#### Setting uo bridge networking
**Between VM guests**
By default, QEMU uses macvtap in VEPA mode to provide NAT internet access or bridged access with other guest. This setup will allow guests to access Internet (if there is an internet connection on the host), but will not allow the host or other machines on the host's LAN to see and access the guests.
**Between VM host and guest**
Libvirt default network
If you use libvirt to manage your VMs, libvirt provides a NATed bridged network named "default" that allows the host to communicate with the guests. This network is available only for the system domains (that is VMs created by root or using the qemu:///system connection URI). VMs using this network end up in 192.168.122.1/24 and DHCP is provided to them via dnsmasq. This network is not automatically started. To start it use:
```bash
virsh --connect=qemu:///system net-start default
```
To make the default network start automatically use:
```bash
virsh --connect=qemu:///system net-autostart default
```
In order for things to work this way you need to have the recommended packages dnsmasq-base, bridge-utils and iptables installed.
**Manual bridging**
To let communications between VM host and VM guests, you may setup a macvlan bridge on top of a dummy interface similar as below. After the configuration, you can set using interface dummy0 (macvtap) in bridged mode as the network configuration in VM guests configuration.
```bash
modprobe dummy
ip link add dummy0 type dummy
ip link add link dummy0 macvlan0 type macvlan mode bridge
ifconfig dummy0 up
ifconfig macvlan0 192.168.1.2 broadcast 192.168.1.255 netmask 255.255.255.0 up
```
**Between VM host.guests and the world**
In order to let communications between host, guests and outside world, you may [set up a bridge](https://wiki.debian.org/BridgeNetworkConnections)] and as described at [QEMU page](https://wiki.debian.org/QEMU#Host_and_guests_on_same_network).
For example, you may modify network configuration file /etc/network/interfaces for setup ethernet interface eth0 to a bridge interface br0 similar as below. After the configuration, you can set using Bridge Interface br0 as the network connection in VM guests configuration.
```bash
auto lo
iface lo inet loopback
# The primary network interface
auto eth0
#make sure we don't get addresses on our raw device
iface eth0 inet manual
iface eth0 inet6 manual
#set up bridge and give it a static ip
auto br0
iface br0 inet static
address 192.168.1.2
netmask 255.255.255.0
network 192.168.1.0
broadcast 192.168.1.255
gateway 192.168.1.1
bridge_ports eth0
bridge_stp off
bridge_fd 0
bridge_maxwait 0
dns-nameservers 8.8.8.8
#allow autoconf for ipv6
iface br0 inet6 auto
accept_ra 1
```
Once that is correctly configured, you should be able to use the bridge on new VM deployments with:
```bash
virt-install --network bridge=br0 [...]
```
You can then use the virsh command to start and stop virtual machines. VMs can be generated using virtinst. For more details see the libvirt page. Virtual machines can also be controlled using the kvm command in a similar fashion to QEMU. Below are some frequently used commands:
Start a configured VM guest "VMGUEST":
```bash
virsh start VMGUEST
```
Notify the VM guest "VMGUEST" to graceful shutdown:
```bash
virsh shutdown VMGUEST
```
Force the VM guest "VMGUEST" to shutdown in case it is hanged, i.e. graceful shutdown not work:
```bash
virsh destroy VMGUEST
```
**Managing VM guests with a GUI**
On the other hand, if you want to use a graphical UI to manage the VMs, you can use the Virtual Machine Manager virt-manager.
**Automatic guest management on host shutdown/startup**
Guest behavior on host shutdown/startup is configured in /etc/default/libvirt-guests.
This file specifies whether guests should be shutdown or suspended, if they should be restarted on host startup, etc.
First parameter defines where to find running guests. For instance:
```bash
# URIs to check for running guests
# example: URIS='default xen:/// vbox+tcp://host/system lxc:///'
URIS=qemu:///system
```
[Using Parrot Linux](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/startpage/) | [Troubleshooting](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/trbl/trbl-start/) | [Linux Beginner Guide](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/library/lbg-start/) | [Home](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/)
\ No newline at end of file
# VERIFY!
NOTE: Currently a WIP (work in progress, some links might not work and some documentation is likely missing.)
# photos missing
Here is a short tutorial on how to install VMware Workstation Pro on Parrot Security. If your wondering what VMware Workstation Pro is and it's function you can visit the site https://www.vmware.com and research it.
Step 1
Download VMware Workstation Pro From http://www.vmware.com/products/workstation/workstation-evaluation.html
Step 2
While your downloading VMware Workstation Pro open a terminal and make sure you install the latest version of GCC with sudo apt-get install gcc-5 and you should see the info on the terminal below read like so.
Step 3
Next open a terminal and cd in to the folder where you downloaded your new copy of Vmware Workstation Pro. After doing so we need to make the file executable to install, so make sure your root in your terminal.
Step 4
Type chmod +x Vmware ( file name and extension) and click enter. It should like the image below.
Step 6
Now in the image below, you can see to install you must type ./VMware (file name ).bundle and press enter and start up will resume. It will ask you for a serial number. There are sites that have serials available that you can use and they are easy to find.
Step 7
Finally, at the end of installation click on the Parrot Security application menu navigate to system tools and you should see VMware Workstation Pro in your menu. After seeing it click on it. After it opens your going to see a box open up with an error shown below. After seeing this error, click on browse and then click file system, then click on USR and finally click on BIN and locate the file of gcc-5 and select it. After selecting it, then click on install and your done installing VMware Workstation Pro on Parrot Security.
Written by Jeff Szydel
&nbsp;
[Using Parrot Linux](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/startpage/) | [Troubleshooting](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/trbl/trbl-start/) | [Linux Beginner Guide](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/library/lbg-start/) | [Home](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/)
\ No newline at end of file
......@@ -2,6 +2,9 @@
# ASK Palinuro are these still good instruction sets?
# If still good organize into table with three columns
## Palinuro says that this list is old as fuck and should be uèdated with the latest nvidia driver in debian/parrot and the boards it supports
Parrot includes three nvidia drivers, the first is the opensource nouveau driver which is pre-installed and supports many common nvidia cards.
The other driver is the official proprietary driver shipped by Nvidia which is divided in 2 drivers, one legacy driver for old devices no longer supported by Nvidia, and the latest Nvidia driver which supports the latest GPUs.
......
# Verify
# ASK Palinuro!
# Merge with GPU tutorial?
# Merge with GPU tutorial? (palinuro: absolutely yes)
# Missing Photos
NOTE: Currently a WIP (work in progress, some links might not work and some documentation is likely missing.)
......
......@@ -10,10 +10,10 @@ visible: true
- Your machine has no AMD / Nvidia graphic card, but you still want to use hashcat.
- You want it more stable and faster than pre-installed driver (beignet)
![opencl](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/img/opencl_1.png)
![opencl](../img/opencl_1.png)
- Hashcat doesn't detect your devices (even if beignet was pre-installed)
![opencl](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/img/opencl_2.png)
![opencl](../img/opencl_2.png)
### 2. How?
- Remove beignet:
```bash
......@@ -31,12 +31,12 @@ install.sh
```
If you have missing libraries in this step (screenshot bellow), you can exit installation and install libraries. If there is only lsb-core>=4.0 is missing, you can move to next step (it worked for me).
- Accept their license, choose next and wait.
![opencl](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/img/opencl_3.png)
![opencl](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/img/opencl_4.png)
![opencl](../img/opencl_3.png)
![opencl](../img/opencl_4.png)
- Hashcat now detect my devices (it shows error with beignet driver)
![opencl](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/img/opencl_5.png)
![opencl](../img/opencl_5.png)
- Benchmark is not very fast (compare AMD / Nvidia devices) but it looks faster than beignet
![opencl](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/img/opencl_6.png)
![opencl](../img/opencl_6.png)
Written by dmknight
......
---
title: 'Should I use Parrot?'
taxonomy:
category:
- docs
visible: true
---
## Why Parrot is different
Even if we, would like everyone to use the Parrot System or, at least, give it a try, there are some important considerations to make about who we expect to use Parrot and who may have a bad experience from it.
First of all, even if Parrot provides general purpose flavors, its core is still tuned for Security and Forensics operations.
In this section we will explain how different is Parrot compared to other general purpose distributions and how different it is from other Pentest and Forensics distributions. Then we will present some categories of people and what kind of experience they may have by using this system.
![macaw-poly](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/img/macaw-poly.jpg)
### General purpose distributions
Parrot is different from a general purpose distribution (i.e. Ubuntu) because it does not try in any way to hide its internals.
Meaning that many automation tools are included in the system to make it easier to use, yet expose quite well what the system has under the hood.
A good example is the *parrot update reminder*: it is a simple yet powerful program that prompts the user to check for system upgrades once a week. but instead of hiding the upgrade process behind a progress bar, it shows the user the full upgrade process from the **apt** output.
Another important difference is that Parrot disables by default all the network services pre-installed in the system, not only to maintain a very low RAM footprint and offer better performance, but also to avoid services exposure in a target network.
Every network service needs to be manually started when the user needs it.
---
### Pentest distributions
Pentest distributions are famous for integrating only security tools, allowing easy root access and taking down all the security system barriers that may influence the workflow of a pentester.
Parrot was designed to be a very comfortable environment for security experts and researchers. It includes many basic programs for daily use which pentesting distributions usually exclude (at the cost of less than an additional gigabyte of storage). This choice was taken to make Parrot not only a good system to perform security tests, but also a good environment where you can write reports, build your own tools, and communicate seamlessly with teammates, without the need for additional computers, operating systems or configuration.
Our goal is to allow any professional pentester to make a whole security test from the beginning, to the report with just a Parrot ISO and an average laptop.
---
### Secure distributions
Parrot includes its own sandbox system obtained with the combination of [Firejail](https://firejail.wordpress.com) and [AppArmor](https://wiki.ubuntu.com/AppArmor) with custom security profiles.
User applications in Parrot are **protected** and **"jailed"** to limit the damages in case the system is compromised.
All this additional security comes with a cost: it is harder to adopt bad behaviors on Parrot. For instance it is not possible to log in as root with the whole desktop environment, or to start critical applications like browsers, media players or advanced document readers with unnecessary privileged permissions.
The user can still open root consoles, launch security tools with privileged permissions and use the system without limits. The only thing that changes is that all the critical user applications are now protected from very bad behaviors and common exploit techniques, and the damages caused by advanced exploits are very limited.
---
### Forensics distributions
Digital forensics experts need an environment that does not compromise their proof.
Parrot comes with automount functions **disabled by default**, to allow forensics acquisitions to be performed in a safe way.
The global automount policy is configured in a redundant way in all the layers of the system stack, from the noautomount kernel option passed by default at boot, to the specific file manager settings to disable auto mount and plug&play features.
Don't forget that the disks are still recognized by the system, and the system will mount them without protections if the user accidentally open them.
The no-automount behavior is consistent and stable, but no protection is provided in case of accidental mounts. A write blocker is always recommended in any digital forensics scenario.
### Who Parrot is made for
* Security Experts
* Digital forensics experts
* Engineering and IT Students
* Researchers
* Journalists & Hacktivists
* Wannabe Hackers
* Police officers and special security institutions
[Using Parrot Linux](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/startpage/) | [Troubleshooting](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/trbl/trbl-start/) | [Linux Beginner Guide](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/library/lbg-start/) | [Home](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/)
......@@ -27,35 +27,23 @@ NOTE: Currently a WIP (work in progress, some links might not work and some docu
### Setup and Configuration
- [System Requirements](../system-requirements/)
- [Install Parrot](../install-parrot/)
- [Persistent USB Live](../usb-live-persist/)
- [Install Debian Standard](../install-debian/)
- [Install Debian-GTK](../install-debian-gtk/)
- [Dual-boot Windows](../dualboot-windows/)
- [Dual-boot UNIX](../dualboot-unix/)
- [Dual-boot Mac](../dualboot-macintosh/)
- [Setting Up Parrot](../setup-parrot/)
- [Firejail](../firejail/)
- [AppArmor](../apparmor/)
- [Mate](../mate/)
- [KDE](../kde/)
- [Xfce](../xfce/)
- [Changing your DE](../changing-de/)
- [Installing GPU Drivers](../gpu-drivers/)
- [Installing OpenCL for Hashcat](../opencl-install/)
- [Network setup](../network-setup/)
- [WiFi Setup](../wifi-setup/)
Virtual Machines and Containers
- [Install VMware](../install-vmware/)
- [Install Virtualbox](../install-virtualbox/)
- [Install Virtualbox Guest Additions](../install-vbox-guest-add/)
- [Install KVM](../install-kvm/)
- [Parrot on Docker](../install-docker/)
- [Parrot on QubesOS](../install-qubes/)
- [Experiments!](../pi-and-other-builds/)
- [System Requirements](system-requirements.md)
- [Persistent USB Live](usb-live-persist.md)
- [Dual-boot Windows](dualboot-windows.md)
- [Dual-boot UNIX](dualboot-unix.md)
- [Dual-boot Mac](dualboot-macintosh.md)
- [Setting Up Parrot](setup-parrot.md)
- [Firejail](firejail.md)
- [AppArmor](apparmor.md)
- [Mate](mate.md)
- [KDE](kde.md)
- [Xfce](xfce.md)
- [Changing your DE](changing-de.md)
- [Installing GPU Drivers](gpu-drivers.md)
- [Installing OpenCL for Hashcat](opencl-install.md)
- [Network setup](network-setup.md)
- [WiFi Setup](wifi-setup.md)
- [ARM and other builds](pi-and-other-builds.md)
......@@ -63,7 +51,7 @@ Virtual Machines and Containers
#### For Developers
Looking for Dev resources?
- [Dev Nest](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/dev/)
- [Dev Nest](../../dev)
......
# Key verification
## Why should anyone verify keys?
## Why should anyone verify keys and signatures?
Most people — even programmers — are confused about the basic concepts underlying digital signatures. Therefore, most people should read this section, even if it looks trivial at first sight.
......@@ -35,7 +35,7 @@ Optional: Complete the steps below if unfamiliar with GnuPG or if they haven't a
3. Get the ParrotSec key.
```bash
wget -q -O - http://archive.parrotsec.org/parrot/misc/parrotsec.gpg | gpg --import
wget -q -O - https://deb.parrotsec.org/parrot/misc/parrotsec.gpg | gpg --import
```
or
```bash
......
......@@ -20,14 +20,14 @@ Debian is a registered trademark of Software in the Public Interest, Inc.
The Parrot and Frozenbox logos (below) are registered trademarks of Lorenzo "Palinuro" Faletra
&nbsp;
![Parrot logo](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/img/parrot-logo-new-sml.png)![Frozenbox](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/img/frozenbox-sml.png)
![Parrot logo](../img/parrot-logo-new-sml.png)![Frozenbox](../img/frozenbox-sml.png)
&nbsp;
All other trademarks are property of their respective owners.
&nbsp;
![GNU GPL v3](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/img/gplv3-with-text-84x42.png)
![GNU GPL v3](../img/gplv3-with-text-84x42.png)
<a rel="license" href="https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-3.0.en.html"></a><br /><span xmlns:dct="http://purl.org/dc/terms/" property="dct:title">Parrot Linux source code</span> by the <a xmlns:cc="http://creativecommons.org/ns#" href="https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/community/team/" property="cc:attributionName" rel="cc:attributionURL">Parrot Linux Team</a><br> Copyright © Lorenzo "Palinuro" Faletra 2013-2019 some rights reserved. <br> Licensed under a <a rel="license" href="https://www.gnu.org/licenses/gpl-3.0.en.html">GNU GENERAL PUBLIC LICENSE v3</a>.
......
......@@ -22,9 +22,9 @@ Warrant Canaries have been found to be legal by the United States Justice Depart
![warrant canary](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/img/warrant-canary.png)
![warrant canary](../img/warrant-canary.png)
Warrant Canary, March 07 2019
Warrant Canary, March 16 2019
......
---
title: 'Linux Beginner Guide Resources'
taxonomy:
category:
- docs
visible: true
---
&nbsp;
&nbsp;
NOTE: Currently a WIP (work in progress, some links might not work and some documentation is likely missing.)
&nbsp;
[Using Parrot Linux](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/startpage/) | [Troubleshooting](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/trbl/trbl-start/) | [Linux Beginner Guide](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/library/lbg-start/) | [Home](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/)
\ No newline at end of file
---
title: 'Linux Beginner Guide'
taxonomy:
category:
- docs
visible: true
---
NOTE: Currently a WIP (work in progress, some links might not work and some documentation is likely missing.)
Add table of contents
- [New to Parrot Linux](new-to-parrot.md)
- [Before Installing](before-installing.md)
[Using Parrot Linux](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/info/startpage/) | [Troubleshooting](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/trbl/trbl-start/) | [Linux Beginner Guide](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/library/lbg-start/) | [Home](https://www.parrotsec.org/docs/)
\ No newline at end of file